Supporting Long-Term Success: Multidisciplinary Approaches to Obesity Management with Bariatric Surgery

Temps de lecture
4 min

Obesity is a global epidemic that affects millions of people worldwide. It is associated with a wide range of health problems, including type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease, stroke, and certain types of cancer (1).

Bariatric surgery is a highly effective treatment option for individuals with morbid obesity (BMI ≥ 40 kg/m² or BMI ≥ 35 kg/m² with obesity-related comorbidities) who have failed to achieve significant and sustained weight loss with traditional weight loss methods such as diet, exercise, and medication (2).

However, the success of bariatric surgery depends not only on the surgical procedure itself but also on the patient's ability to make and maintain healthy lifestyle changes after surgery.

Young woman measuring her waistline

Hypnosis is a complementary and alternative treatment method

Dr Marius Nedelcu
*free UK calling (home phone/smartphone).

 

Hypnosis is a complementary and alternative treatment method that has been used to help patients adopt new eating habits and manage stress associated with bariatric surgery (3).

Hypnosis involves inducing a state of heightened awareness and suggestibility in the patient, during which the therapist can provide positive suggestions to promote changes in behavior and thought patterns.

Several studies have demonstrated the benefits of hypnosis in weight loss and stress management, particularly when combined with other psychological interventions such as cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) (4).

Coaching is another method used to support patients

Coaching is another method used to support patients in their weight loss journey after bariatric surgery.

A coach can help patients adopt and maintain healthy lifestyle behaviors, such as exercise, stress management, and decision-making skills.

There are two types of coaching: sport coaching and life coaching. Sport coaching focuses on physical activity, while life coaching focuses on broader aspects of life, such as relationships, career, and self-esteem (5).

Both types of coaching can help patients develop the skills and motivation needed to achieve and maintain weight loss goals.

Dietetics and bariatric surgery management

Dietetics is a critical aspect of bariatric surgery management.

A dietitian is a healthcare professional who specializes in food and nutrition.

Dietitians can help patients adopt a healthy and balanced diet that is tailored to their individual needs after surgery.

They can provide advice on food choices, meal planning, and coping strategies to manage cravings and emotional eating behaviors.

Dietitians can also help patients maintain a healthy relationship with food and prevent nutrient deficiencies that may arise after bariatric surgery (6).

Other Approaches for patients after bariatric surgery

Dr Marius Nedelcu
*free UK calling (home phone/smartphone).

 

Several other approaches can be used to support patients after bariatric surgery.

Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is a psychological intervention that can help patients modify negative thought patterns and behaviors that may contribute to obesity.

CBT can also help patients develop coping strategies to deal with stress and emotional eating (7).

Mindfulness-based eating awareness training (MB-EAT) is a mindfulness-based intervention that can help patients develop a more positive and accepting attitude toward food and eating.

MB-EAT can also reduce binge eating behaviors and improve self-regulation of food intake (8).

Finally, support groups can provide social support and motivation to patients after bariatric surgery.

Support groups can also provide a safe and supportive environment for patients to share their experiences and concerns with others who have undergone similar experiences (9).

Conclusion

Bariatric surgery is an effective treatment option for individuals with morbid obesity who have failed to achieve significant and sustained weight loss with traditional weight loss methods.

However, the success of bariatric surgery depends not only on the surgical procedure itself but also on the patient's ability to make and maintain healthy lifestyle changes after surgery.

A multidisciplinary approach to obesity management is essential to ensure long-term success after bariatric surgery.

Several methods can be used to provide support to patients after bariatric surgery, including hypnosis, coaching, dietetics, and other approaches.

Hypnosis can help patients adopt new eating habits and manage stress associated with bariatric surgery.

Coaching can help patients develop and maintain healthy lifestyle behaviors, such as exercise, stress management, and decision-making skills.

Dietetics is a critical aspect of bariatric surgery management and can help patients adopt a healthy and balanced diet that is tailored to their individual needs.

Other approaches, such as CBT, MB-EAT, and support groups, can also provide support to patients after bariatric surgery.

It is essential that healthcare professionals work together to provide comprehensive care and support to patients before and after bariatric surgery.

The collaboration of a surgeon, a psychologist, a dietitian, and an exercise specialist, among others, can ensure that patients receive individualized care that addresses their unique needs and challenges.

By providing ongoing support and guidance, healthcare professionals can help patients achieve and maintain long-term weight loss and improve their overall health and quality of life.

Sources

  1. World Health Organization. Obesity and overweight. Available at: https://www.who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/obesity-and-overweight.
  2. American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery. Updated position statement on sleeve gastrectomy as a bariatric procedure. Available at: https://asmbs.org/resources/updated-position-statement-on-sleeve-gastrectomy-as-a-bariatric-procedure
  3. Elkins GR. Hypnotherapy for the management of obesity. Int J Behav Med. 2015 Apr;22(2):252-61. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/17558718/
  4. Kirsch I. Hypnotic enhancement of cognitive-behavioral weight loss treatments: another meta-reanalysis. J Consult Clin Psychol. 1996 Jun;64(3):517-9. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/8698945/
  5. Bennett GG, Glasgow RE. The delivery of public health interventions via the Internet: actualizing their potential. Annu Rev Public Health. 2009;30:273-92. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/19296777/
  6. Kushner RF, Ren Fielding C. Preparing the patient for bariatric surgery. In: The ASMBS Textbook of Bariatric Surgery. Springer, New York, NY. 2014:27-33.
  7. Cooper Z, Fairburn CG, Hawker DM. Cognitive-behavioral treatment of obesity: a clinician's guide. Gilford Press. 2003.
  8. Kristeller JL, Wolever RQ. Mindfulness-based eating awareness training for treating binge eating disorder: the conceptual foundation. Eat Disorder. 2011 Jan-Feb;19(1):49-61.
  9. Bocchieri LE, Meana M, Fisher BL. Perceived psychosocial outcomes of gastric bypass surgery: a qualitative study. Obes Surg. 2002 Dec;12(6):781-8.

 

Dr Marius Nedelcu
*free UK calling (home phone/smartphone).

 

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